12/1/12

Book Review / by Cara Phillips




5.0 out of 5 stars
 
Boaz Aviram's Krav Maga - Use of the Human Body as a Weapon Philosophy and Application of Hand of Hand Fighting Training System, 1 Aug 2010
By CP - See all my reviews

This review is from: Krav Maga - Use of the Human Body as a Weapon Philosophy and Application of Hand to Hand Fighting Training System (Paperback)

I have read quite a number of Martial Arts, Self Defence and Krav Maga books in my time, but none have been written with as much authority as this one.

Boaz details the strengths of Krav Maga as opposed to classical martial arts in a structure that is informative and interesting without being condescending to other combat art forms.

His writing style progresses smoothly enhancing the readers ability to understand the various applications that he is describing. The written descriptions are enhanced by clear sequential photographs.

Where some books strive to be nothing more than an alleged training manual promising the reader black belt information, this book, however, differs, not only does it enable the reader to concentrate on solid basic techniques and preparation, but is also a great manual for those that have practicised Martial Arts, Self Defense or Combat Arts for several years.

It will give you total understanding and good foundation for solid practical use of basic techniques to enhance the users ability to perform even complex moves well and enable them to teach novice practitioners to a good standard.

Boaz has accomplished this by taking the time to look in detail at human biology and the use and effects of various strikes against different areas of the human body.

This in itself is a technique that very few martial art / self defence systems even attempt to explain.

It is one that is of vital importance to anyone whose is either a practitioner or instructor, as a good understanding of the human body and its weak areas or the weaknesses in each area enable a practitioner to be more effective when it becomes necessary to strike in a defensive situation.

Although Boaz does not claim that his book is a `black belt manual' it is clear and apparent to the reader that he has included many techniques, explaining them in detail with the use of photographs, that this writer can verify are the most common forms of attack that may be recorded by police forces across the globe.

These range from a defence against a simple punch up to and including anti car-jacking techniques against armed assailants using guns and knifes.

Other techniques include defence against what many arts would describe as grappling techniques i.e. defence against being grabbed by the neck at various angles, headlocks, bear hugs, and defence against rear chokes.

This book will not disappoint anyone with a serious wish to improve their Krav Maga, Self Defence or practical Martial Art skills and training.

I can whole heartedly and without equivocation recommend this book to anyone whether they be complete novice with intention of beginning training, a practitioner with experience or indeed a qualified (no matter how highly) instructor.
Cara Phillips, Belfast, N.I., United Kingdom.

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